summer art: the making of traditional paint

Summer is a busy season. There are a lot of photo jobs, many fun things to do with friends, and I have a summer cottage to take care of and spend time in. This is my way of saying: sorry about the very infrequent blog posts! To show you that I’m not just being lazy this summer,  I thought I’d share some photos from a wonderful couple of days two weeks ago, when I painted the summer cottage with my partner and a couple of very good friends.

We made the traditional Falu red paint ourselves, mixing ingredients and boiling the paint for several hours. It was the first time I ever did this, so it was quite exiting! Everything worked out well, and we managed to make the cottage look a bit happier. See for yourself!

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It was high time to paint the cottage, as you can see.

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One of the good things about this traditional paint is that you don’t have to remove the old paint – you just need to clean it up a bit. We spent one evening doing just that.

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The following morning, we started making the paint. Apart from the pigment, it consists of water, flour, ferrous sulfate and linseed oil.

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The pigment goes in last, so we spent 2 hours cooking 20 litres of this not-so-tasty-looking porridge. It needed to be stirred all the time, so it was good to have interesting people around.

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After adding the pigment, it finally started looking like paint! Then we just had to wait for it to cool down enough to be applied to the walls.

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We boiled the paint in 3 separate buckets, but mixed it all up before we started painting, to make sure we wouldn’t get different shades of red on the walls.

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… and the painting could begin!

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Apart from the mosquito clouds around our heads, we had a lot of fun! The making of the paint and the painting took the whole day, but then again, we counted on that.

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Before and after.

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Everybody working hard (except the photographer, of course). Pay attention to the stylish clothing, mostly assembled from the old stuff my grandparents, who gave me the cottage, left there.

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The result! The white corners are the next project, but it already looks much better, I think.

See? Not pure laziness. :)

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7 thoughts on “summer art: the making of traditional paint

    • Thanks, Pip! I’m pretty happy with how it turned out. :) Sometimes I wish my life would be a bit more like that… But I’m very happy anyway.

      Thanks for the comment!

  1. I’d always been curious about the making of that paint – now I know! Thanks! The cottage looks utterly charming, and having good friends to help is wonderful!

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